Text Box: Differentiated Instruction / Data Workshop - Lesson Planning Guide
Text Box: Differentiated Instruction / Data Workshop - Lesson Planning Guide

Lesson Focus:How to Manage Differentiation Essential Question:How do you think managing differentiation might affect student success?

Length of Lesson: 30 minutes Mono OR Multi-Task Structure: Multi-Task
Objectives:
Content:
  • SWBAT identify different strategies to manage differentiation in their own classrooms by answering the questions, “How do I prepare to differentiate?” “How do I prepare my students and my classroom?” and “How do I manage the groups and activities?”
Language :
  • Students will practice listening skills when teacher introduces the topic of managing differentiation.
  • Students will summarize a section of the reading with their group and then orally present their summary to the class.
Objective Assessment Plan:
  • Teachers will check in for understanding with students during the group activities.
  • Exit tickets (which will ask the essential question) will be used as a source for assessment as well.
Key Vocabulary and Concepts:

SESSION 1
Time: 7 minutes
SESSION 2
Time: 10
Session 3
Time: 8 minutes
SESSION 4
Time: 5 minutes
Briefing
Teaching Activity
Follow Up
Debriefing
Teacher 1 will pass out index cards asking students whether they prefer to work alone or in groups. These will be collected after 1 minute. Teacher 2 will introduce students to the topic of how to manage differentiation in the classroom. Students will share initial ideas related to the questions: “How do I prepare to differentiate?”
“How do I prepare my students and my classroom?” and “How do I manage the groups and activities?” Teacher will use a blue marker to write student’s initial thoughts under the corresponding question.
Meanwhile, Teacher 1 will organize the groups based on their index cards answers and set up group stations.
Teacher 2 will then go over rules and expectations for group work and let the class go into their groups.
Class will split up into groups based on whether or not they like to work alone or in groups. The four groups will each focus on one aspect of how to manage differentiation:
  1. 1. Preparing to Differentiate
  2. 2. Preparing students and the classroom
  3. 3. Managing student work
  4. 4. How do you and your students keep track of your work?
Groups will learn and about and be able to summarize their topic so that each member of the class will be able to share something new they learned in their group with the rest of the class. Each student should be taking notes on key points about their topic and how their topic relates to the three questions introduced at the beginning of the class.
Groups will come together as a class and each member in each group will share something new they learned about their group’s topic, which question(s) it relates to, and why. Teacher 2 will use a red marker to catch students’ thoughts and ideas marker under the three questions that were written at the beginning of class.
Class will use the questions and answers display to summarize what they learned.
Meanwhile Teacher 1 will pass out exit tickets that will ask, “How do you think managing differentiation might affect student success?”

Grouping Plan:
4 groups based on group or individual work preference.

-Up to two individual groups
Grouping Plan:
Whole class


Materials Needed:
  • Textbook - Differentiating Instruction in the Regular Classroom
  • 4 group folders for workstations including directions, pictures illustrating chapter 9: “How to Manage Differentiation,” and matching board materials.
  • Handheld recorder
  • Paper
  • Pencils/Pens
  • Time-filling handout on managing differentiation
Materials Needed:
  • 3 Large sticky notes to write answers to the questions: “How do I prepare to differentiate?”
“How do I prepare my students and my classroom?” and “How do I manage the groups and activities?”
  • Red marker


Expected Product:
Student product of what they learned. Can be recorded through use of:
  • Notes
  • Pictures
  • Audio Recording
Expected Product:
Three posters (large sticky notes) with contributions from each student in the class. On these sticky notes, each student will share what they learned from their group work to answer any of the three questions the class began to answer at the beginning of the lesson. The difference between the answers in red marker (post-assessment) vs. blue marker (pre-assessment) will show what students learned from the lesson.

Joint Productive Activity:
One teacher will introduce the topic of managing differentiation in the classroom and pre-assess students understanding of this topic by asking them to answer the questions, “How do I prepare to differentiate?” “How do I prepare my students and my classroom?” and “How do I manage the groups and activities?” The teacher will write the students’ answers in blue marker on large sticky notes.
Students will then split into four groups based on their preference of group work vs. independent work. Each group will be assigned one topic to learn about in the “How to Manage Differentiation” chapter. Students will be able to gather information about their assigned topic through viewing pictures, reading the chapter, discussions, or completing matching boards. They will be able to record what they learned in any manner that works best for them: writing, drawing, or an audio recording of discussion. The teachers will walk around from group to group to check for understanding and answer questions any students may have.
The four groups will then come back together to share what they have learned with the class. Each student will share something they learned in their group and decide which question they think what they have learned addresses: “How do I prepare to differentiate?” “How do I prepare my students and my classroom?” or “How do I manage the groups and activities?” The other teacher will then use the same sticky notes to write what the students have learned under the corresponding questions in red marker.
The class will then use the question/answer boards to discuss what they have learned about how to manage differentiation.








Preparing to Differentiate (pg. 125)

Directions:
  • Every class member will share one thing they learned about their group’s topic and how what they learned relates to one of the questions:
    • o “How do I prepare to differentiate?”
    • o “How do I prepare my students and my classroom?”
    • o “How do I manage the groups and activities?”

For groups –
  • Work with your group to come up with key points about how to prepare for differentiation in your classroom.
  • Use the resources that you find most helpful and easy to understand. These resources include what’s in your folder (images and matching board), your DI textbook, and discussion with your groupmates.
  • Record information you learn in whatever manner makes most sense to you (i.e. written notes, picture notes, or you can ask Miss Warner if you can check out the audio recorder to record your group’s discussion).

For individuals -
  • Use the resources that you find most helpful and easy to understand to come up with key points about how to prepare for differentiation in your classroom. These resources include what’s in your folder (images and matching board), your DI textbook, and your reflective thoughts about the topic.
  • Record information you learn in whatever manner makes most sense to you (i.e. written notes, picture notes, or you can ask Miss Warner if you can check out the audio recorder to record what you’ve learned).


Preparing Students and the Classroom (pgs. 125-126)

Directions:
  • Every class member will share one thing they learned about their group’s topic and how what they learned relates to one of the questions:
    • o “How do I prepare to differentiate?”
    • o “How do I prepare my students and my classroom?”
    • o “How do I manage the groups and activities?”

For groups –
  • Work with your group to come up with key points about how to prepare students and your classroom for differentiation.
  • Use the resources that you find most helpful and easy to understand. These resources include what’s in your folder (images and matching board), your DI textbook, and discussion with your groupmates.
  • Record information you learn in whatever manner makes most sense to you (i.e. written notes, picture notes, or you can ask Miss Warner if you can check out the audio recorder to record your group’s discussion).

For individuals -
  • Use the resources that you find most helpful and easy to understand to come up with key points about how to prepare students and your classroom for differentiation.
  • . These resources include what’s in your folder (images and matching board), your DI textbook, and your reflective thoughts about the topic.
  • Record information you learn in whatever manner makes most sense to you (i.e. written notes, picture notes, or you can ask Miss Warner if you can check out the audio recorder to record what you’ve learned).

Managing Student Work (pgs. 126-128)

Directions:
  • Every class member will share one thing they learned about their group’s topic and how what they learned relates to one of the questions:
    • o “How do I prepare to differentiate?”
    • o “How do I prepare my students and my classroom?”
    • o “How do I manage the groups and activities?”

For groups –
  • Work with your group to come up with key points about how to manage student work.
  • Use the resources that you find most helpful and easy to understand. These resources include what’s in your folder (images and matching board), your DI textbook, and discussion with your groupmates.
  • Record information you learn in whatever manner makes most sense to you (i.e. written notes, picture notes, or you can ask Miss Warner if you can check out the audio recorder to record your group’s discussion).

For individuals -
  • Use the resources that you find most helpful and easy to understand to come up with key points about how to manage student work.
  • These resources include what’s in your folder (images and matching board), your DI textbook, and your reflective thoughts about the topic.
  • Record information you learn in whatever manner makes most sense to you (i.e. written notes, picture notes, or you can ask Miss Warner if you can check out the audio recorder to record what you’ve learned).


How Do You and Your Students Keep Track of Your Work? (pg. 128)


Directions:
  • Every class member will share one thing they learned about their group’s topic and how what they learned relates to one of the questions:
    • o “How do I prepare to differentiate?”
    • o “How do I prepare my students and my classroom?”
    • o “How do I manage the groups and activities?”

For groups –
  • Work with your group to come up with key points about how you and your students keep track of your work.
  • Use the resources that you find most helpful and easy to understand. These resources include what’s in your folder (images and matching board), your DI textbook, and discussion with your groupmates.
  • Record information you learn in whatever manner makes most sense to you (i.e. written notes, picture notes, or you can ask Miss Warner if you can check out the audio recorder to record your group’s discussion).

For individuals -
  • Use the resources that you find most helpful and easy to understand to come up with key points about how you and your students keep track of your work.
  • These resources include what’s in your folder (images and matching board), your DI textbook, and your reflective thoughts about the topic.
  • Record information you learn in whatever manner makes most sense to you (i.e. written notes, picture notes, or you can ask Miss Warner if you can check out the audio recorder to record what you’ve learned).

“Preparing to Differentiate” matching:
Match underlined segments with segments that aren’t underlined.
Glue the corresponding pieces next to each other on this piece of paper.

Two main ideas to keep in mind when preparing to differentiate
Start small and start with what is
What you should do if s strategy doesn’t work
Try a different one!
What can you do with existing activities
Sort them, figure out which students would benefit from them, take advantage of the ones you have that will work.
Teaching
Takes planning, time, and a great deal of energy.



“Preparing Your Students and Classroom” matching:
Match underlined segments with segments that aren’t underlined.
Glue the corresponding pieces next to each other on this piece of paper.

Before the differentiated activity, make sure to set up guidelines for
Behavior, sound, and your availability during flexible group time.
In order to avoid a mad rush of students all over the room, you should
Set up clear patterns for movement.
In order to avoid a mad search for materials, you can
Organize them into work folders or have group assignments and work cards ready to go.
Parents
Can be used as resources to help during flexible group time.

“Managing Student Work” matching:
Match underlined segments with segments that aren’t underlined.
Glue the corresponding pieces next to each other on this piece of paper.

You can help students know where to go by
Posting names on the board, an overhead transparency, flip chart, or table tent.
You can use plastic bins
To organize materials and workcards.
Distribution of materials can be more efficient through the use of a
Distribution center set up in your classroom, or through assigning one student from each group to distribute supplies and materials.
Directions can be given
Orally and visually, on bulletin boards, workcards, or procedure checklists



“How Do You and Your Students Keep Track of Your Work” matching:
Match underlined segments with segments that aren’t underlined.
Glue the corresponding pieces next to each other on this piece of paper.

Informal chats and scheduled student conferences are some ways
You can keep track of student work.
Checklists
Can be used as an efficient, objective tool to keep track of student work.
Students meet with a partner from their work group and give each other constructive criticism.
Peer review
Worklogs
A tool students can use to record their own progress on an activity that spans several class periods.